The Animal Doctor by Dr. Michael W. Fox

Electropollution and 5G Should Concern All

DEAR DR. FOX: I always enjoy your column in my daily Times-News, but your reference to smart water meters worries me.

Please don’t spread bad science; you have many scientifically naive readers who trust you. Please see the 2013 Huffpost article “Smart Meters, Dumb Science.”

I appreciate all the information you give on animal nutrition and environmental dangers, and pass the info on to friends with pets. I’m concerned when you get into areas you are less of an expert on and spread alarm about things that don’t warrant concern. -- A.B.R., Hendersonville, North Carolina, retired from New York Power Pool (NYISO Control Center)

DEAR A.B.R.: Thanks for opening the discussion on an issue that is not backed by “dumb science,” as stated by smart meter safety advocates and others in the wireless technology industry.

I have been researching this topic for some time, since being alerted by a veterinarian colleague who is highly electrosensitive. Veterinarians and dairy farmers alike have been aware for decades how “stray voltage” and electromagnetic fields affect cows’ health, behavior and productivity. Here is a synopsis of what I consider a global threat to public, animal and environmental health.

High-speed 5G is a technology associated with electropollution harmful to the bioelectrical fields of normal, healthy cells in all living organisms -- human, animal, plant and microorganism. The World Health Organization has designated this form of nonionizing radiation as a possible carcinogen. For more details, read my review “Electropollution: Existential Threat to Public Health and Planetary Life?” posted on my website (drfoxonehealth.com).

Dr. Samuel Milham, MD, MPH, in his book “Dirty Electricity,” warns that because of the recent proliferation of radio frequency radiation from cellphones and towers, terrestrial antennas, Wi-Fi systems, broadband internet over power lines, and personal electronic equipment, we may be facing a looming epidemic of morbidity and mortality. In the book, he reveals the steps we must take, personally and as a society, to coexist with this marvelous but dangerous technology.

The first veterinarian to highlight problems in this area with companion animals, to my knowledge, was Dr. Allen Schoen (see www.drschoen.com/2011/09/01/). And Josh Hart wrote on stopsmartmeters.org about a woman and her dogs, all of whom had adverse reactions after a smart water meter was installed in her home.

Robert Kennedy Jr., chairman of Children’s Health Defense, has committed to being proactive on the concerns regarding excessive exposure of our children to 5G and wireless radiation. CHD has filed a lawsuit against the FCC for its Dec. 4, 2019, decision to decline to review its 1996 guidelines, and for its determination that the guidelines are protective of human health.

The Environmental Health Trust has also addressed this problem and offers flyers that could be given to parents, teachers and other concerned parties. Visit ehtrust.org/resources-to-share/printable-resources.

Veterinarians, scientists and others around the world are signing up to ban 5G telecommunications. Visit 5gspaceappeal.org for more information.

Activist Arthur Firstenberg writes on this topic in his book “The Invisible Rainbow.” A summary is available at 5gexposed.com.

Finally, to find out how many cellphone towers and wireless antennae there are within a 2-mile radius of your home, go to antennasearch.com. You may be in for a big surprise.

DEAR DR. FOX: I’ve been using your homemade dog food and would like to try the meat alternatives you mention in the recipe: “cottage cheese, well-cooked lentils, garbanzo beans, lima beans or a dozen organic eggs.”

How exactly are these alternatives incorporated into the recipe? Do you simply add the respective meat alternative as you would the actual meat, and simmer with the other ingredients? Does the “well-cooked” description only apply to the lentils, or to the other items as well? If using organic eggs, are they precooked (scrambled?) before adding them, or are they added raw?

By the way, my miniature schnauzer loves this recipe and looks great. -- B.C., Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

DEAR B.C.: I am glad that your dog is doing well on my home-prepared dog food recipe. Your dog joins many others who are reaping the benefits of good nutrition and a healthful diet.

I would add the raw eggs, at room temperature, to the basic recipe once it has been cooked, letting the eggs become lightly cooked as you stir them into the hot mix. Ditto for the cottage cheese. Overheating the eggs will destroy some nutrients, while feeding raw eggs can cause other problems. The lentils or chickpeas you can cook in with the basic ingredients, but be sure to add around 250 milligrams of taurine per serving at feeding time when using such pulses/beans as the main source of protein.

I do not advocate vegan diets for dogs, and advise a “rotational” diet using different sources of protein week by week.

(Send all mail to animaldocfox@gmail.com or to Dr. Michael Fox in care of Andrews McMeel Syndication, 1130 Walnut St., Kansas City, MO 64106. The volume of mail received prohibits personal replies, but questions and comments of general interest will be discussed in future columns.

Visit Dr. Fox’s website at DrFoxOneHealth.com.)